Burden, Chris & Smith, Alexis - B Car with Exhibition Invitation

Regular price $800.00

Chris Burden and Alexis Smith. 
B Car. 
Laid in accompanying exhibition invitation.

Los Angeles: Choke Publications, 1977.
Staple-bound softcover. 
24 pages. 
Illustrated in black and white. 

Near fine but for faint edge wear.
A very presentable copy. 

Laid in is an accompanying exhibition card.
Double sided postcard / announcement
published in conjunction with show opening April 1, 1977
and the launch of Chris Burden's artist's book / catalogue, B-CAR.

Rubber stamped in red "Catalogue Available".
Hand-addressed to artist Eve Sonneman. 
Minor unobtrusive edgewear. 

This self-published book is a documentation
of Chris Burden’s 1975 attempt to design and construct
a one passenger vehicle capable of traveling 100 miles per hour
and achieving 100 miles per gallon fuel efficiency.
Exhibited in 1977, the final B-Car (Bicycle Car) was capable
of traveling 50 miles per hour with a fuel consumption
of approximately 150 miles per gallon.

“During the two month period between August 24
and October 16, 1975, I conceived, designed, and constructed
a small one passenger automobile. My goal was
to design a fully operational four-wheel vehicle which would
travel 100 miles per hour and achieve 100 miles per gallon.
I imagined this vehicle as extremely lightweight, streamlined,
and similar in structure to both a bicycle and an airplane.
Once the project was conceived, I was compelled to realize it.
I set the goal of completing the car for two shows in Europe.
I saw building the car as a means toward the end of driving
it between galleries in Amsterdam and Paris as a performance.
When I arrived in Amsterdam, I knew that the accomplishment
of constructing the car had become for me the essential experience.
I had already realized the most elaborate fantasy of my life.
Driving the car as a performance was not important after
the ordeal of bringing it into existence.
The car is not completely engineered; most of the parts
are hand-made, and many of the decisions in design
and construction were based on hunches.
As I worked, I kept all the sketches and drawings
as a record of the process. Displayed with the car,
they became documentation of the construction.
The car and drawings represent a vision—my fantasy
as an artist of what a car should be.” - Chris Burden